Author: simon

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ZAP 2.11.0

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ZAP 2.11.0 (also known as the OWASP 20th anniversary release) is available now. Major changes include: Alert Tags Alerts can now be tagged with arbitrary keys or key=value pairs - this can be done via the desktop GUI and the API. All of the active and passive scan rules have been updated to include tags for the OWASP Top 10 2021 and 2017.

Baseline Scan Changes

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Important information for anyone who uses the baseline scan in the Live or Weekly Docker images.

Collecting Statistics for Open Source Projects

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This blog post will show you how you can collect and publish statistics on your open source projects using free resources and open source scripts, based on the setup we have for ZAP.

ZAP Report Competition

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Help us add modern, useful and stylish reports to ZAP - the competition is now open until October 1st 2021.

Sites Tree Modifiers

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The Sites Tree is a key component of ZAP, and one whose purpose is often misunderstood. This blog post will explain why the Sites Tree is so important, how you can change it now and how you will be able to change it in the next ZAP release.

ZAP is Ten Years Old

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On September 6th 2010 I posted this message to Bugtraq: Title - The Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) version 1.0.0. From those very humble beginnings ZAP has now become what we believe is the world’s most frequently used web application scanner.

Is ZAP the World’s most Popular Web Scanner?

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I’ve stated that ZAP is the world’s most popular free and open source web application scanner on stage at security conferences around the world for many years. No one has ever contradicted me so it must be true :) However I’ve started to wonder if ZAP is actually more popular than most if not all of the commercial scanners as well?

Dark Mode in the Weekly Release

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We release ZAP every week: https://www.zaproxy.org/download/#weekly We’re happy to announce that this week’s release includes the first steps towards an all new dark mode for the ZAP Desktop UI: It’s early days - not all screens use suitable colours, but it should be mostly usable. To enable it in the weekly release:

The ZAP Blog has Moved

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OK, OK, it's been a long time since the last ZAP blog post. But we certainly have not been idle - since that last blog post we've published 3 full ZAP releases, well over 100 weekly releases and a shiny new web site: https://zaproxy.org/

ZAP Browser Launch

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We have just released a new feature for ZAP that allows you to launch browsers from within ZAP. The browsers are automatically configured to proxy via ZAP and ignore certificate warnings, making it much easier for people to get started with ZAP as well as for more experienced users who want to use ZAP with a variety of browsers.

Scanning APIs with ZAP

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The previous ZAP blog post explained how you could Explore APIs with ZAP. This blog post goes one step further, and explains how you can both explore and perform security scanning of APIs using ZAP from the command line. This allows you to easily automate the scanning of your APIs.

Exploring APIs with ZAP

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APIs can be challenging for security testing for a variety of reasons. The first problem you will encounter is how to effectively explore an API - most APIs cannot be explored using browsing or standard spidering techniques. However many APIs are described using technologies such as: SOAP OpenAPI / Swagger These standards define the API endpoints and can be imported into ZAP using 2 optional add-ons.

Introducing the JxBrowser add-on for ZAP

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As modern web applications are increasing their reliance on JavaScript, security tools that do not understand JavaScript will not be able to work effectively with them. ZAP already has components like the Ajax Spider and DOM XSS scanner that work by launching browsers and controlling them via Selenium, and we are planning to make much more use of browsers in the future.

Announcing ZAP Unit Test Bounties

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Unit tests are wonderful things, but they are painful to add to a mature project that doesn’t have enough of them. We would love to have more ZAP unit tests, and we are therefore launching a Unit Test Bounty program, where we pay for unit tests for specific areas of the ZAP codebase.

ZAP 2.5.0

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ZAP 2.5.0 is now available. This release contains a large number of enhancements and fixes which are detailed in the release notes. API changes There have been some API changes which are not backwards compatible, and the reason for the version change to 2.5. These are detailed in the release notes.

ZAP Newsletter - 2016 March

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Introduction Welcome to the March newsletter, read on for some really good news, details of the new site level stats ZAP now supports and an introduction to scripting. News The big new this month is that ZAP was voted the TOP free/open source security tool for 2015 by Toolswatch readers: https://www.

ZAP Newsletter - 2016 February

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Introduction Welcome to a slightly delayed February newsletter - we were holding on for some expected news that will now have to wait until next time ;) News We have started another user questionnaire. We ran one 2 years ago - the answers were very helpful and definitely shaped the direction ZAP is now taking.

ZAP Newsletter - 2016 January

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Introduction Happy New Year! For the first newsletter of 2016 we have a special feature on a new vulnerability “XCOLD Information Leak” that caught the eye of one of our key contributors, how he found it and how you can use a new ZAP rule to detect it.

ZAP Newsletter - 2015 December

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Introduction Welcome to the second ZAP Newsletter. And apologies for the delay - 2.4.3 took longer than expected, and last week I was away at a Mozilla work week. News The big news is that ZAP 2.4.3 is now available to download. This is a development and bugfix release, for more details of all of the changes see the release notes.

ZAP Newsletter - 2015 November

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Introduction Welcome to the first monthly ZAP newsletter. We plan to cover pretty much anything ZAP related in these newsletters, including newly created or updated add-ons, new features just implemented and 3rd party tools. We also encourage contributions from people like yourself - see the last section for details.

ZAP Q&A Session - Tuesday 13th October 2015

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The first online ZAP Q&A Session was held on Tuesday 13th October. You can listen to a recording of the session here. Please leave feedback via this Google Form. Some links to resources mentioned in the session or related to the questions: The DOM XSS add-on The Context Alert Filters add-on The Revisit Add-on The Access Control add-on The vulnerabilities detected by ZAP How to set up form based authentication The community-scripts repo Note that you can download add-ons from within ZAP via the Marketplace.

ZAP as a Service (ZaaS)

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At OWASP AppSec EU in Amsterdam this year I announced ZAP as a Service (ZaaS). The slides are here and the video will hopefully be available soon. The idea behind this development is to enhance ZAP so that it can be run in a ‘server’ mode. This is different to the current ‘daemon’ mode in that it will be designed to be a long running, highly scalable, distributed service accessed by multiple users with different roles.

Hacking ZAP #4 - Active scan rules

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Welcome to a series of blog posts aimed at helping you “hack the ZAP source code”. The previous post in this series is: Hacking ZAP #3 - Passive scan rules Active scan rules are another relatively simple way to enhance ZAP. Active scan rules attack the server, and therefore are only run when explicitly invoked by the user.

Hacking ZAP #3 - Passive scan rules

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Welcome to a series of blog posts aimed at helping you “hack the ZAP source code”. The previous post in this series is: Hacking ZAP #2 - Getting Started One of the easiest ways to enhance ZAP is to write new passive scan rules. Passive scan rules are used to warn the user of potential vulnerabilities that can be detected passively - they are not allowed to make any new requests or manipulate the requests or responses in any way.

Hacking ZAP #2 - Getting Started

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Welcome to a series of blog posts aimed at helping you “hack the ZAP source code”. The previous post in this series is: Hacking ZAP #1 - Why should you? In order to change the ZAP source code you will need to set up a development environment. Requirements The following software is used/required to obtain and build ZAP (core) and the add-ons:

Hacking ZAP #1 - Why should you?

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Welcome to a series of blog posts aimed at helping you “hack the ZAP source code”. ZAP is an open source tool for finding vulnerabilities in web applications. It is the most active OWASP project and is very community focused - it probably has more contributors than any other web application security tool.

ZAP 2.0.0 and the Google Summer of Code 2012 Projects

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We are getting close to releasing the next major version of ZAP. As there are so many changes we've decided to go to version 2.0.0 rather than 1.5, and some of the biggest changes have come about thanks to the Google Summer of Code (GSoC). This is the first year in which ZAP has taken part in the GSoC, and it has been a resounding success.

ZAP Weekly Releases

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I've been struggling with the question of ZAP releases. We've made loads of enhancements to ZAP recently, and I want them to be available to as wide an audience as possible. But I also want to make sure our ‘full’ releases remain as robust and stable as possible.

OWASP ZAP – the Firefox of web security tools

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The OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (otherwise known as ZAP) is a free security tool which you can use to find security vulnerabilities in web applications. My name is Simon Bennetts, and I am the ZAP Project Leader; there is also an international group of volunteers who develop and support it.